Amulet of Elemental Vulnerability

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Trunk-only: This article pertains to a feature of Crawl which is being tested. It will likely change before the next release, and may even be removed entirely.
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A blue-steel amulet. Its creator, an exceedingly practical woman, designed it to provide powerful protection against mundane jabs, stabs and bites. It's worse than useless against fire and frost, but how often does anyone really need to worry about that?

the amulet of Elemental Vulnerabilty

+8 AC
rPois
rC--
rF--

Desirability

The amulet of Elemental Vulnerabilty is an odd piece of jewellery. Matching the ring of the Tortoise's amazing AC buff is quite great, and poison is the killer of many, many characters. But even in the Dungeon, there are many elemental threats. Orc wizards can Throw Flame, you don't want to be stuck next to an ice beast, and the occassional branded weapon or vault might catch you off guard. The Lair isn't safe either - a rime drake is bound to ruin your day. Crawl is a game filled with complexity, and many characters (such as a bow wielder) will have a simpler time by ignoring this item outright. Still, AC and rPois can help simplify the game for many others (such as a weaker melee build in Lair).

If and when you've found them, other amulets can compete heavily with this unrand. An amulet of regeneration provides strong protection in ordinary combat scenarios (and poison, too), while the amulet of reflection provides comparable defenses. Of course, they don't come with an elemental downside.

Note that vulnerability does not stack; you'll take 150% fire damage whenever you have rF- or rF--. However, it does mean that it is exceedingly difficult to get rid of said vulnerability, at least while still wearing the amulet.

This artefact is more likely to spawn in the early game, where it is more likely to be useful.

History

  • The amulet of Elemental Vulnerabilty will be introduced in 0.29.

References